Biblical God as Central Planner

Here’s something I don’t get.  Maybe someone can explain it to me.

As a generalization, both scientific atheists and Abrahamic monotheists tend to be inconsistent when it comes to their preferences of socioeconomic organization.  Most of your central planners in history seem to have been atheists–Marxism and communism are definitely atheistic systems.  And most of those who still stick with these concepts in the modern era also seem to be atheists.  Your Christian left-anarchist is an anomaly.  Liberal Democrats I suspect–I haven’t looked up the stats–have more atheists, or at least agnostics among them.  And it’s my perception that Liberal Democrats tend to be more liberal in their religious belief and believe that evolutionary theory is true.  I base this perception on the fact that Liberal Democrats take the non-religious side of the abortion discussion.  That alone indicates a liberality in religious belief.  But yet, Liberal Democrats tend to be less friendly with free market ideas, more open to state programs, and generally more on the central-planning side of the economic discussions.

Or maybe none of us are really thinking for ourselves.

Meanwhile, more conservatives (whether Conservative Republicans, or otherwise) are religious, and conservatively so.  I’d point to the abortion discussion again to support this assertion.  And, again, conservatives have a greater tendency to be free market oriented, rhetorically if not in actual fact.  This can be seen in a rough sort of way by comparing various elected persons’ party affiliation with their position on the funding of various governmental (and non-military) projects, such as universal health care, welfare programs, student loans and so on.

I’ll skip over the rest of the logical development and give you my central point: in America, a substantial number of non-religious people have faith in centrally planned civilization while a substantial number of religious people are opposed to central planning, and presumably believe in the power of emergent market processes to create an organized society.

This seems inconsistent to me.  To be religious, by which I mean to believe in a single scriptural god, tends to deny the emergent processes of nature.  If God is the decision maker for all reality, and evolutionary theory is not true, then emergent market processes are anomalous.  Why would markets be able to find equilibrium, and develop into non-planned organization when the rest of nature does not do the same thing?

And to be non-religious tends to accept evolutionary theory–a concept which describes a natural world full of life that has come about without intent or central planning.  Why in a world where life emerges in the absence of a supernatural director would we insist upon fallible human beings to design and execute our economy?

To my point of view, and regardless of your religious beliefs, I would expect that you either believe in orderly emergence or you don’t.  I can understand believing in a perfect God that micromanages reality and how that is consistent with free market beliefs, but I don’t see how you can then throw out evolutionary theory.  And I can see how you can see the natural world as a beautiful orderly accident without a god, but I don’t see how you can then allow imperfect and corruptible human beings take charge of an economy, which is often as complex as any ecosystem.

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